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Vinyl Comeback Driven By Young Adults

Whilst CD sales have seemingly dwindled for what appears to have been an age now, undoubtedly the old granddad of music formats has returned with timeless charm to once again reign as the cool kid on the block. As a recent Music Week report confirms this finding, in a digital age where iPod's, white black and red headphones rule, portable music isn't the be all and end all for a younger generation... the 18-24 year-old market also love the most un-portable playback device possible; Vinyl.


Although there is some unbridled irony here it has to be said that this finding isn't really very surprising. The popularity of becoming your own disc jockey for the younger generation is an essential fashion trend incorporated into the 'vintage' love scene with a design that is relentlessly plastered all over t-shirts and those neon yellow underground scene posters that you see on the sides of lampposts and retail victims of the recession. In addition vinyl players have become quite inexpensive thanks to the wonders of developing technology that can be produced on a mass scale and, in the room of the teenager, that big silver unit with its entrancing spinning motion makes any of its consumers look like a serious music bod. Either way, in the Music Week study it highlighted that what this young demographic likes most is the physical artwork of the sleeve and the beauty of the record itself and this outweighs the sonic quality of this medium, so once again we are brought back to the fashion statement.


According to the Music Week report, the 18-24 age group was by far the highest vinyl consumer age range with 14% having bought a vinyl in the last month of which 10% regularly visit an independent record store a month and, on average, spend over £15 per visit. Maurice Fyles, the research director at ICM Research said that "Our research shows that independent record stores are driving and fulfilling a growing demand for music on vinyl – from new Limited Editions to second-hand collectibles."... “With the closure of many branches of HMV some might expect that demand for music shops and physical formats are declining – our research rejects this. Rather, when there is so much music available to buy or download online, people’s needs from the high street record store have changed. Independent record stores offer a diverse, interesting and rare range of music – and that seems to be the key to their continued survival. It’s a real sign that our high street is evolving to changing consumer needs, and that other local independent retailers can take encouragement from this story.”


Edd Harris

Whilst CD sales have seemingly dwindled for what appears to have been an age now, undoubtably the old granddad of music formats has returned with timeless charm to once again reign as the cool kid on the block. As a recent Music Week report...

Edd Harris  - 24th April 2013

Article Ref: #VinylComebackDrivenByYoungAdults