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Is Music No Longer a Creative Industry Mr Osborne?

Is Music No Longer a Creative Industry Mr Osborne?

The Pro Audio Web Blog

As we see the year 2012 come to a close, what are the quick 'on the whole' conclusions that we can make? With private funding levels up from last year, the popularity of new revenue generating music consumption platforms becoming increasingly popular over the direct pirating of music, and more musicians being inspired by the events of the London 2012 Olympic Games, it has without a doubt been a better year than the last.


However, there is a big but here. Two weeks ago George Osborne, the British Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced that the government would inject a £6 million boost in funding to the creative industries and tax breaks for the purpose of fuelling economic growth. The problem here is that at no point did Osborne mention the music industry. Whilst he directly addressed the film, television, animation and video games industries he failed to recognise music as a creative industry. 


For Osborne 2012 has been a year which has yielded a number of embarrassing moments which seated in the musical realm. In May Osborne appeared on the Andrew Marr show where the Sussex-Born rock band 'Keane' gave a live performance during which Osborne gave a rather shocking display of fake 'head-bobbing' actions after noticing that the camera was focussed on him (this video is located to the right). This was was subsequently uploaded onto YouTube where users mocked these actions. As much as this was embarrassing for Osborne and cringeworthy for any viewer to witness, this creative funding debacle omitting the music industry is possibly yet another embarrassing moment.


Even though two weeks have passed, Osborne has still failed to comment on whether any of this cash injection will be channeled off into the grass roots of british music industry where future generations will have a globally competitive education. I would imagine here that if the budget has not directly mentioned music then none of this money will be going here. One of the suggestions that I would like to make is that when last year Osborne retired the one-hundred and fifty year budget box, in favour of a new £4,300 designer one, it would have been better in keeping the tradition and ploughing that money into a community youth music project.


Edd Harris

As we see the year 2012 come to a close, what are the quick 'on the whole' conclusions that we can make? With private funding levels up from last year, the popularity of new revenue generating music consumption platforms becoming...

Edd Harris 20th December 2013

Article Ref: #GeorgeOsborneMusicCreative