Footer
Homepage About Us News Reviews Interviews & Tutorials Discover Contact Us
Twitter Follow @proaudiowebblog Google YouTube Instagram Pinterest Twitter YouTube Pinterest Instagram Google

Spotify Rival: ‘Google Play Music All Access’

Spotify Rival Google Play Music All Access Is Released

Google Music

In a world where music piracy is so rampant it is widely considered a normal activity, music streaming site Spotify could be considered revolutionary. By allowing users to stream high quality audio of over 20million tracks for free, Spotify have gained over 24million users, and made $500million in revenue in the process. It comes as no shock that web giant Google want in, and have recently announced plans to launch a rival streaming service, named ‘Google Play Music All Access’.


The rather clumsily named streaming service was announced at Google’s annual I/O conference in San Francisco on the 15th of May.  The service has been made available as an Android and a web browser application from the 25th of May, and boasts licensing deals with several major labels, including Warner Music and Universal.


Users will be able to access this content for a fee of $9.99 per month. Some may consider this a drawback, as part of the appeal of Spotify is the free option, that lets users access Spotify’s entire catalogue. Despite having to put up with adverts and having limited plays, it’s undeniable that people are drawn into Spotify’s promise of seemingly unlimited free music. However, whilst this may not be good for users, it may help somewhat towards the problem of Spotify losing money, which independent sources have reported it has done for the last 2 years. There is also evidence that free streaming hurts the artist, too: famously technophobic metal overlords Metallica’s record sales dropped to 35% below their expected sales in the week after their catalogue was finally uploaded to Spotify in 2012. It seems that forcing the user to pay a subscription fee is a concerted effort by Google to combat these losses, but only time will tell if it actually works.


Another feature Google mentioned at the conference was the “listen now” feature. Whilst Google claims that Google Play will be as interactive or “leanback” as the users wants it, users who choose to make use of the “listen now” function will be given a playlist based on their listening habits. Whilst Spotify boasts similar features, such as the “radio” function, and various apps that can build playlists based on entering your listening habits, this feature could be more closely catered to the users taste, as Spotify’s playlist generating features are hit and miss, to say the least.


Whether Google will be able to compete with the momentum Spotify has gained since 2008 is yet to be seen. Whilst the features Google are introducing are certainly interesting, there is nothing revolutionary about them, and the mandatory subscription fee is destined to turn off many users. The app is schedule to be available from the 25th though, so try the free 30 day trial and decide for yourself.


Sean Lewis

In a world where music piracy is so rampant it is widely considered a normal activity, music streaming site Spotify could be considered revolutionary. By allowing users to stream high quality audio of over 20million tracks for free, Spotify have...

Sean Lewis - 25th May 2013

Article Ref: #GooglePlayMusicAllAccess