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Compilation Albums Strengthen Industry With Comeback

NOW Music Album Cover

Recently we reported on how ten years of Apple's iTunes changed the post-modern music industry by encouraging single track sales over full single-artist albums. In a digital switchover which drew blood from the perishing veins of the music industry, the introduction of a new supply-in-demand consumption ethos with a freedom of sale action that could be vastly responsible for dwindling profits and artists more than ever desperately turning to volatile pressing and distribution deals. However, we should point out that the under-the-hood mechanics of the music industry is quite a complex beast where recent statistics categorically defines a dependence on the compilation album.


For consumers the Compilation album is a tuned collection of music that appeals to a certain genre or lifestyle demographic. Having been around for thirty years, the 'Now That's What I Call Music' compilation is a historical trendsetter from EMI and Universal Music that has paved the way, in conjunction of the iTunes revolution, to encourage profitability through guaranteed revenue streams. Unless you have been living under a rock, for the past few years you would have noticed a significant increase in compilations not only for certain genres but also tailored to empower activities that include: working out at the gym, driving along, relaxing in whatever environment, running down the road, getting in the spirit to go clubbing, doing a spot of DIY, hell even falling in love with someone to. In fact the statistic that was recently released by the BPI shows that in 2012 there was a 7.2% increase in one year and that almost half of the albums downloaded were compilations.


Years ago it was predicted by almost everyone that the compilation album was due for an imminent demise so it was a shock when sales figures soured over the past few years. Geoff Taylor, chief executive of the BPI, said that “For many years commentators have predicted the demise of the compilation,”“but these albums offer an expert filter; someone has done the work for you by picking the best of the genre.” In fact compilations are so popular now and provide such a huge amount of revenue that they have their own album chart and the historical 'Now' albums have branched out to specialise such as 'Now That's What I Call Reggae' and 'Now That's What I Call Disney'. Here we believe expect that the compilation albums will continue to soar for the next few years but it is still likely that they will decline as and when consumer habits change. In the meantime go and grab yourself an album to read our articles to and sell it.


Edd Harris

Recently we reported on how ten years of Apples iTunes changed the post-modern music industry by encouraging single track sales over full single-artist albums. In a digital switchover which drew blood from the perishing veins of the music...

Edd Harris  - 4th May 2013

Article Ref: #CompilationAlbumStrengthen